Legal Marketing News

Opioid Crisis causes Purdue to stop marketing OxyContin to Prescribers

picThe US Department of Health and Human Services reports that more than 115 Americans die every day from opioid overdose.[1]  These opioids include OxyContin made by Purdue Pharmaceuticals.  In response to the growing crisis that is affecting nearly every sector of the population, Purdue announced that it will no longer be marketing to doctors.  The company has reduced its sales team and is restructuring their focus from direct, in-person marketing to physicians to helping to combat the crisis.

 

How Prescription Pain Pills became a leading cause of death in America

Opioid overdose is nothing new.  Opioids include prescription painkillers such as OxyContin and Hydrocodone, but also include opiates such as morphine and heroin.  Overdose from opiates has happened throughout time, but the huge increase over the last two decades can be directly related to the increase in sales of prescription pain killers.  The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration estimates that 40% of all opioid overdoses were due to prescription opioids.  The overall number of deaths from opioid overdoses increased five times since 1999.[2] Doctors were told that the prescription pain killers being given to patients were not addictive.  Aggressive, direct-marketing to doctors by pharma giants Purdue and others, led to a large increase in prescriptions and, in turn, a large increase in the number of patients who became addicted to these substances.

Documents from cases settled regarding the misleading information distributed by sales representatives for the pain killers indicates that employees were told to minimize the addictive quality of the drugs.  Major sales tactics began almost immediately after the US Food and Drug Administration approved the drug in 1996.  Sales of the drugs quickly drew into the billions for pharmaceutical giants manufacturing the drugs.

 

Future Problems for Prescription Pain Killers

The opioid epidemic has affected millions of people all across the United States.  It has captured national headlines and gotten the attention of local representatives as well as politicians across the nation.  Pressure is mounting against pain killer manufacturers that misled doctors and consumers about the addictive quality of the drugs and presented information that was not backed by scientific data.  Purdue has already paid out millions.  In 2007, the company entered a guilty plea for “misbranding” the drug.  The company took an uncompromising approach to selling OxyContin directly to physicians claiming that the time-release feature of the drug would prevent misuse of the drug and reduced the potential for addiction.  [3]

Government agencies, consumers and others have begun filing lawsuits against opioid manufacturers.  A federal judge overseeing more than 200 lawsuits regarding the epidemic urged the focus to be to “dramatically reduce the number of opioids that are being disseminated, manufactured and distributed.” [4]  Purdue in a complete reversal has agreed to join these efforts by stopping the promotion of OxyContin to doctors and find ways to fight misuse and overdosing.

Are you an attorney interested in representing individuals afflicted by the opioid crisis?  Now is the time to get involved.  Opioid litigation is heating up and too many individuals have suffered at the hand of drug manufacturers and distributors.  Amicus Media Group can help you acquire cases with comprehensive media campaigns.  We work with digital marketing campaigns, TV and radio ads to help you get the cases you deserve.  Contact us for more information today.

 

 

This blog post does not contain legal or financial advice. Author and publisher disclaim any and all warranties, liabilities, losses, costs, claims, demands, suits, or actions of any type or nature whatsoever, arising from or any way related to this blog, the use of this blog, and/or any claim that a particular technique or device described in this blog.

 

[1] https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/images/data/OpioidDeathsByTypeUS.PNG

[2] https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/data/index.html

[3] http://www.nytimes.com/2007/05/10/business/11drug-web.html

[4] https://www.clarionledger.com/story/news/2018/01/26/opioid-epidemic-litigation-dan-polster/1014046001/

Johnson & Johnson stock falls as Talc cases proceed in court

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Johnson & Johnson’s stock fell five percent on a recent Monday alone.  The market decline comes after a report was released that could expose documents detrimental to the company.  Johnson & Johnson is facing thousands of lawsuits regarding its baby powder.  Many claim that the Talc powder manufactured by J&J contains asbestos causing ovarian cancer and mesothelioma in some patients.

 

Johnson & Johnson has repeatedly denied that the product contains these products.  This comes after several verdicts against the pharmaceutical giant.  Baby powder is considered a cosmetic and therefore does not require the same US Food and Drug Administration testing as prescription and over-the-counter drugs.  Currently there are over 5,500 lawsuits pending against the drug company regarding their baby powder.  The company continues to defend its product saying that the Talcum powder contained in the product is safe.

 

The lawsuits hinge on the argument that Johnson & Johnson failed to adequately warn consumers about the risk of repeatedly applying the talc-based product to their body, particularly the increased risk of ovarian cancer when talc is applied to the genital area.  Record verdicts have been returned in some of the first talcum powder cases to go to trial.  In one California case, a plaintiff was awarded $70 million in compensatory damages and $347 million in punitive damages.  A Los Angeles Superior Court Judge has since reversed the jury’s verdict.  A new trial is pending in the matter at Johnson & Johnson’s request.

 

The debate over the safety of talcum powder has existed since the 1970s.  To date, the matter has not been definitively settled.  The International Agency for Research on Cancer has classified talc-powder, when repeatedly applied to the genital area, as “possibly carcinogenic to humans.”  Some talc-based products manufactured by other companies contain a warning about the possible link to an increased risk of ovarian cancer.  Johnson & Johnson, however, maintains that its product is safe and free from harm even with repeated use.

 

If you or a loved one has developed mesothelioma or ovarian cancer after repeated use of Johnson & Johnson’s baby powder, you need to speak to an attorney immediately.  Call our offices today to speak to a knowledgeable case manager.  We work with the top firms across the nation who handle talcum powder litigation.  Amicus Media Group provides comprehensive marketing campaigns for attorneys and law firms.  We are dedicated to providing case acquisition with less risk.  Contact our offices today to learn more about talcum powder litigation and the pending lawsuits against drug manufacturers such as Johnson & Johnson.

Tips for Young Lawyers: How to Find your Way in a Crowded Arena

picYoung lawyers can face some uphill battles out of law school.  The dream of defending the innocent, prosecuting the guilty or triumphing for the little guy is quickly overshadowed by the crowded practice of law.  Recent articles such as Huffpost’s “Mamas, Don’t Let Your Babies Grow Up to be Lawyers” and CBS News “5  Reasons Not to Get a Law Degree” don’t help the cause.  They point out the high cost of law school, low number of jobs and high level of unemployment.   According to the State Bar of California there are currently 191,334 actively practicing law in the state.  That is a lot of competition for one area.  So, now that you have graduated law school and passed arguably one of the hardest bar exams in the nation, what do you do when faced with these seemingly insurmountable obstacles?

 

Easy, you buckle down.  Dig in your heels and fight to be the best damn lawyer you can.  You take everything that you learned inside and outside of law school and apply it to becoming an irreplaceable member at your firm.  You learn to network and, deep breath, sell yourself.  You listen and learn from others who have been there and done that.  It may seem like a daunting task, but these tips will help you get there.

 

  1. Get an Elevator Speech.

 

An elevator speech is a short sales pitch.  In your case, the thing you are selling is you.  Generally, your pitch should be around 30 seconds to two minutes.  You need to be able to market yourself to other attorneys, potential clients and other networking potentials in a short amount of time.  In a crowded field you need to stand out, but not sound disingenuous.  Promoting yourself does not have to sound like a used car salesman.  Use this technique in every aspect of your life.  The ability to sell will help you persuade judges, juries, potential clients and other attorneys to agree with you.

 

  1. Love what you do.

 

Enthusiasm goes a long way.  It may not be easy right out of law school to practice something you are passionate about.  You are likely leaving with a large amount of debt and you have bills to pay.  But the quicker you know what you love and start practicing something you are passionate about or working for clients that you truly care about the easier it will be to set yourself apart and to sell yourself.  Great sales people know the importance of passion, find your passion.

 

  1. Get Invested.

 

Get invested in what you do, the people you work with and the people you work for.  Get emotionally involved in every aspect of your work.  It will show, and it will pay off.  Find a mentor to learn from.  Choose someone who truly cares and who is willing to invest in you.  You want honest feedback and you need someone to help you overcome challenges and celebrate victories.  Find someone who you aspire to be like, but who is also something like you. Find someone who has some of the same characteristics and traits that you have and that will champion you whenever you aren’t around.

 

  1. Never stop learning.

 

The State Bar requires you to be constantly learning and growing as an attorney, but you need to do more than just the obligatory Minimum Continuing Legal Education (MCLE). You should never stop honing your skills.  You should become an expert in your field.  Once you have mastered a topic, try to get on a speaking circuit.  Speak at local bar associations and conferences.  Seek out people who do what you do better and learn from them.  After you have been practicing for a few years go back to the basics and write a few motions.  Work on your argument techniques.  Attend training classes and webinars.  Watch other attorneys.  Become the best attorney that you possibly can and people will take notice.  People always take notice of the athlete that is first on the field and last to leave.

 

  1. Consider your reputation.

 

No matter who you are, no matter where you work, you should always be networking.  Burning bridges will never get you ahead in the field of law.  While there are a lot of lawyers, the community is pretty close knit.  You will run into your classmates from law school.  You may be opposing counsel, you may attend the same conferences, you may even be competing for the same job.  You never want to leave a bad taste in someone’s mouth because word gets around quickly.  A bad reputation can ruin even a good attorney.  Look at every opportunity as a networking possibility.  Be the person that people think of when they want to refer a case or recommend a potential client.  Be the person at the firm that is respected, not trashed behind closed doors.

 

Amicus Media Group provides TV, Radio and Digital Campaigns for national and regional case acquisition.  Grow your firm and get the cases from a company founded on Trust, Transparency and Track Record.

 

This blog post does not contain legal or financial advice. Author and publisher disclaim any and all warranties, liabilities, losses, costs, claims, demands, suits, or actions of any type or nature whatsoever, arising from or any way related to this blog, the use of this blog, and/or any claim that a particular technique or device described in this blog.